Thursday, 15 June 2017

Live Review: Nasty + support @ Levontin 7, Tel Aviv [25th May 2017]

Nasty
03
Ostra Torn


There are some bands that I thought might never come to this country and when they actually do, it's not something to miss out. Tonight, a variety of people from the different hardcore scenes in Tel Aviv have gathered at Levontin 7 to witness the crazily heavy beatdowns of Belgian hardcore crew Nasty.



Östra Torn




Starting off tonight's proceedings is Haifa trio, Östra Torn. I've already reviewed these guys recently when they supported Zaga Zaga and I was really impressed by their doomy/sludgy hardcore. They did a very similar set tonight, set up in a triangle and just making the loudest noise possible. The band walks the fine line of playing loose enough that the music feels more natural and free-flowing but tight enough that no-one is loosing their place and they're all on the same page. The band hasn't got anything recorded yet (soon to come, though, I believe..) but watching them live is essential. You find yourself in some sort of tennis-spectator mode, as your eyes bounce from screaming bassist Nir to more growly guitarist Dean while drummer Ofer goes crazy amidst the heavy riffs and rumbling bass. I think that even when they do eventually release something, this is a band that can also be solely enjoyed live without needing to be familiar with the material. As long as you like things slow, heavy and energetic, you'll be smiling the whole show.

4/5


03



It was quite disappointing to hear shortly beforehand that tonight is 03's (Efes Shalosh) last show, so I think there's a lot of people who have come almost exclusively in support of them. Like Östra Torn, I have reviewed 03 before but with varying reviews. They've definitely become the tough hardcore powerhouse that they are now since the addition of guitarist Lemmy, who always jumps about the stage like his guitar's a kid's toy! With the recent release of their first album This Is Survival, Not A Revival, more people have gotten to hear exactly what this band does and have therefore gained more recognition. I still wouldn't go as far as saying that they're breaking any new ground in hardcore but they've certainly helped bridge that gap between hardcore and metalcore in this country, even bringing both fanbases to their shows.


As always, singer Jenia struts about the stage and the venue floor with his razor blade vocals blasting out of the speakers while the band delivers their Born From Pain meets Madball hardcore with infectious energy that rubs off on the crowd. The track Bruce Lee will forever be the band's Clobberin' Time; like the Sick Of It All song, it's less than a minute's worth of thunderous instrumental hardcore that just gets everyone pumped, making it the highlight of every show. They definitely have the right grooves to get people moving and a general likability but it just always feels like they're lacking something that separates them from the rest of the hardcore world.

 Hopefully, the band are not splitting up completely but just taking a break for a while and will come back with some fresh new material.

3.5/5



Nasty



All these years, I've wondered what kind of people would turn up to see some proper European beatdown hardcore. Tonight, there's a bunch of faces I've never really seen before as well as a few familiar ones. I was still unsure by what the reaction would be as normally any form of hardcore show out here tends to be still pretty "punk" in terms of the dancing and the general attitude. Although 03's set saw a bit of "violence", things went up a notch for Belgian posse Nasty.


Pretty much from the start, the pit has opened up and we see some 2-stepping, spin kicks, windmilling and stage diving as Nasty plough through their low-tuned, boisterous, hip-hop tinged hardcore. Frontman, Matthi, roams about the stage, getting everyone fired up and encouraging all the pit-action. The rest of the band also give it their all on stage, with Paddy (guitar) and Berri (bass) bouncing around and Nash smashing the kit behind them.

To be honest, the rest of the show becomes a bit of a blur as it just gets so crazy (and a literal blur because I took my glasses off to avoid any mishaps). As the band plays hits like Shokka, Lying When They Love Us and Slave To The Rich, bodies start flying all over the place, knocking the monitors off the stands in front of the stage. This leads to Matthi deciding to move all the monitors to the side of the stage and leave the front completely free for stag diving and sing-a-longs.


Whereas you can sometimes come across bands who are in the mindset of just turning up, plugging in and playing, it seems as though Nasty are genuinely excited to be experiencing a show in Tel Aviv, making sure that everyone's having a good time and especially that there's some carnage. There's very minimal talking between songs and nothing gets too "preachy". Even when it gets to the finale of anti-fascist anthem Zero Tolerance, Matthi mostly spreads some PMA instead of getting political.



This has to be one of the most "hardcore" shows I've ever been to in Israel, in terms of seeing some of the dancing I grew up seeing in the London scene. Maybe it's because of my age but I actually felt too intimidated to join in as much as I would have liked to. That said, it was still cool to just watch from the sidelines. Where I once originally thought of Nasty in a similar way as a band like Emmure (i.e. immature heavy music for college jocks), my views have changed. Nasty are simply a tough hardcore band with some solid beatdowns and try to touch upon serious topics in the most aggressive yet also fun ways possible. 



4/5

All photos courtesy of Miguel St Labao



Monday, 3 April 2017

Live Review: Zaga Zaga Album Release Show @ Levontin 7, Tel Aviv [18th March 2017]

Zaga Zaga
Östra Torn
Mitromemot

Noisy Tel Aviv hardcore punk outfit, Zaga Zaga, have released a new full length album. In order to celebrate it, they have invited their fanbase and friends to Levontin 7 to witness the new material live. They have also invited two new bands to open up for them.


Mitromemot


Up first is Tel Aviv based Mitromemot (which apparently means "faggots"). As I'm sure happens in most small scenes, sometimes new bands will pop up made from members of other popular/once-popular bands. Mitromemot consists of drummer Oneg (also the current Haium HaDeomgraphy drummer), guitarist Adi (Deaf Chonky), bassist Benjamin (Almonim Metim) and vocalist Mati (ex-Erev Rav). Having only just put out their debut self-titled EP, this is also their debut show. However, there's already a lot of people eager to see them. The band plays all of the 8 rapid and aggressive songs from the EP (no longer than 1 min 30 secs each) which run in a similar vein to the aforementioned Almonim Metim and Erev Rav. Out of those songs, Savta Coeset (Grandma's Angry/Angry Grandma) stands out the most. Although a song I cannot personally relate to, it simply speaks of the true and familiar generation gap between modern Israeli liberals and their Jewish/Zionist elders. As an added bonus, the band also treats the crowd to an interesting Hebrew rendition of the straight edge classic Minor Threat by the legends of the same name. I didn't actually recognise it due to never having heard the song in Hebrew before but those who get it are singing along and holding Mati aloft. All in all, it might not be the type of hardcore punk I would normally choose to listen to but the band has the right amount of passion behind the music and Mati has turned into one hell of a performer, screaming his lungs out and owning the stage.

3/5


Östra Torn


Man, Haifa has been giving birth to a lot of heavy shit! As one of the bands to have been born out of the demise of Haifa hardcore heavyweights Barren Hope, the next band on, Östra Torn (which I believe is Swedish for "East Tower"), similarly play low-tuned, fuzzy, metallic hardcore. On stage, the trio align themselves in a triangle so as guitarist, Dean, and bassist, Nir can both see equal amounts of each other, the crowd and drummer, Ofer. As they aggressively plough through a thunderous set of Nails/Trap Them/Soulground heaviness, Dean and Nir share vocals, with their different styles complimenting one another well. I basically had a grin from ear to ear throughout most of the set; it just hits that spot in my brain that really responds to crushingly angry music. If these guys can stay around longer than Barren Hope, I can easily see them as a welcomed addition to either Prosthetic or Nuclear Blast roster.

4/5

Zaga Zaga




Yes, yes..I'm having to write about Zaga Zaga again! To be honest, I'm writing this review more to give some publicity to the supporting acts. I've written about Zaga Zaga a lot over the passed couple of years. Although my views on them did change after the first couple of times seeing them, they've since just been consistently fun to watch live that there's never really been nothing new to say. With the release of their self titled album (which some are calling their debut, although I personally consider Year One their first proper album), they've now just added more crazily fast, heavy and noisy songs to their set. Joining classic crowd-pleasers such as The Dancer, (I Just Called To Say) I Hate Your Band and Industrial Estate (my personal favourite due to its interesting question-answer guitar breakdown), new tracks such as Black T and Cancer Man are already seeing the crowd get involved. Razorblade Razorblade, although from the new album, has been in the band's repertoire for quite some time. It's jagged, dissonant groove always manages to get my head moving.

There is still a part of me that finds some of the faster songs flying right by me like a barrage of shouting and shredding, but there are at least songs which have enough balance of groove and rapid intensity which make them one of the more interesting bands in the scene at the moment. Also, every time I watch them, I'm reminded of a quote that a friend read in a band's biography (I think it was The Sonics). It was something along the lines of "If you haven't sweat enough from a show that you can throw your shirt at a wall and make it stick, then you didn't give a good enough performance." Tonight, I was worried guitarist Ben was going to create a fire hazard with what was pouring out of his face onto his pedals! Even if the music isn't your thing, everyone can admire how Zaga Zaga give 110% on stage.

3.5/5


Photos by David "Doh Doh" Rosen

Thursday, 9 March 2017

Review: Kids Insane - Cluster [10th March 2017]


Breaking out of the Israeli music scene is quite a difficult feat. In the Israeli punk and hardcore world, it's even more difficult. However, one of the bands that have been making waves in recent years is Tel Aviv's Kids Insane. Having secured themselves European tours with the likes of Defeater and Slander, played shows with bands like Gnarlwolves and Bane and also getting on a few festival lineups, the band have slowly but surely been gaining some attention. I even met a German guy at a festival in The Netherlands wearing a Kids Insane T-shirt. That's some solid recognition right there!

With the addition of Dust guitarist, Ofek, the band are about to release their 2nd full length album, Cluster. The band's debut album, All Over, garnered the band a firm following with their slightly dark, angst-ridden Defeater/Touché Amoré style hardcore. With their Frustrated EP and Split EP with Slander, the band's sound has been seen to be evolving bit by bit. As previews of newer songs in recent shows have already suggested, that process has continued and taken them into new realms.

On Cluster, the band still have some of the same energy as before but with an added "rock n roll swagger" similar to Every Time I Die, John Coffey and even The Bronx. Frontman Corey has always been able to hold a note but here his voice has more melody and takes on a more rock timbre, as do Ofek's dirty riffs, Nadav's solid bass and Yoni's thunderous drumming. Songs like opening track, Left Right Left, Killing Us (which features overly British guest vocals by Thom Weeks of Gnarlwolves) and Not A Slave provide infectious melodic singalongs which differ from their previous more shout-worthy anthems.

Overthinking and Full Tank are similarly more tuneful in a way that is odd to hear. While the former utilises back-up oohs and an organ like a spooky 6os garage rock song, the latter can easily be mistaken for Trent Reznor fronting Deftones at the start but then everything changes when those mighty riffs kick in. 

Even with the vocals and riffs bringing something new to the table, Cluster still includes songs like Varicose and Not Yet which hark back to their classic aggressive hardcore sound. The band have managed to experiment and keep some sort of consistency in quality (of both musicianship and production) and style throughout the record. Nothing sounds out of place and it all strings together pretty well. However, it could be questioned how natural this all is. Not only is their usual subject matter about oppression and hating where you live starting to sound a little cliché but some of the empowering choruses come across as forced attempts to create the next best hardcore anthem. That said, who isn't guilty of that?! As a fan of The Bronx and Hot Damn! era Every Time I Die, I actually embrace the Kids Insane's musical detour and find Cluster to be an interesting record as a whole, with some songs even getting stuck in my head. For others who fell in love with the simple angst of All Over, it might take some time to fully appreciate it.


3.5/5

Thursday, 16 February 2017

Review: Hotbox - White Trash EP [January 2017]



Every decade has its stand out genres; the 60s had motown and garage rock, the 70s had glam rock and disco, the 80s had punk and synth pop and the 90s had Brit Pop and grunge. For the late 90s and early 2000s, kids were starting to get into rap-metal and nu-metal. Although it may seem dated now, it still has its fans and none are more obvious than this band.


Hailing from South Israel (Arad/Beer Sheva), Hotbox, the country's answer to Californian outfit Hed PE aka (hed) Planet Earth aka (həd) p.e., have done a lot for the Israeli underground scene, teaming up with bands of various genres to put on guerrilla shows and even their own festival using their own equipment. After some wait, the band have released their new EP, White Trash. 

Most of the songs on White Trash (and the band's repertoire in general) have that same bouncy groove and macho flavour as the aforementioned Hed PE. In particular, first full track, Rap Guillotine, has a riff that sounds identical to that of Killing Time. I won't say it's a rip off, as I am fully aware that these things can sometimes happen (I once realised I had almost totally rewritten a TAD song and pretty sure I hadn't even heard it before) but many may see this as a little unoriginal. I happen to love Hed PE, so it's hardly a bad song to bare similarities to, in my opinion.

The rest of the EP stays with that Juggalo-metal type vibe with lyrics mostly containing expletives (motherfucker, shit, bitch etc..) and both sexually explicit and aggressive language in general. The band's MC, Cise2 (or..Dave), certainly has a fast Bionic Jive-like delivery but the lyrical content tends to be a little cliché most of the time. It's only by the last two tracks, Ugh! and Use A Friend, where a little bit more thought seems to have been put into his words. Whereas the former is still an angry track which anyone who's ever hated their job would relate to [raises hand], the latter is a more heartfelt ode to a friend who passed away. I say friend, there are signs that it is in fact about an actual pet dog as a opposed to "my dawg". Either way, the more meaningful lyrics teamed with a passionate vocal delivery on top of a laid back yet still heavy groove make Use A Friend the EP's stand out track. 


It's quite difficult to make music like this in this day and age, so Hotbox certainly get credit for not giving a fuck and playing what they love. Alongside punk and hardcore, I have a soft spot for rap-metal, so I see them as bringing something a little different to the scene out here. White Trash has a decent production and is fun for those who already love this genre. However, if they actually want to get anywhere and gain any recognition based on their music, they need to start bringing something new to the table. 


3/5

Thursday, 2 February 2017

Live Review: Atari Teenage Riot + support @ Gagarin, Tel Aviv [29th December 2016]

Atari Teenage Riot
Mechonat Hereg
Eternal Struggle
Soleil Bone



Although bands who plan to come to Israel often get bombarded with negativity by anti-Israel activists and the like, never was there more of it from within the country itself than when self proclaimed anti-fascists and fans of Israel, Atari Teenage Riot (ATR), announced their Tel Aviv concert. Many people were confused at how anti-fascists can love Israel and thus saw the band as hypocritical. At least this is how it came across online. It turns out that more people were just a bit annoyed that such an underground (albeit highly influential and respected) act as these German originators of the digital hardcore sound were playing such an expensive show. However, that hasn't stop most of the people who have come out tonight, both to see ATR and the interestingly mixed local support. 


Soleil Bone


  Unfortunately, I arrived a little late and missed opening act, Nute, but did arrive in time to check out the weirdness that is Soleil Bone (pronounced Bo-nay, I believe). Noise/experimental music has never been my favourite genre. I like it when it has a lot of intensity, passion and a even a hint of structure. Soleil Bone are more along the "let's just play and see what happens" method of noise. With a drummer (initially masked) playing quite sparsely, a guitarist creating a lot of fuzz and distortion, a guy on a controls making random noises and a vocalist growling the majority of the time, it's certainly an interesting support act but hardly anything breathtaking. It reminds me of a band made up of old guys I saw a few times in Derby, who I believe were called God Has Tits. They basically just got on stage and had a go at instruments. I think that Soleil Bone know how to play... but decide to go down a less musical path.



2/5


Eternal Struggle



I might need to stop reviewing these guys soon as I don't really have anything new to say. Among all the more metalcore bands and hardcore punk bands in the county, Eternal Struggle bring that crushing NY-style hardcore that I've always loved. They're pretty damn lucky to be put on this line-up. It might not make sense to many people having a Hatebreed/Born From Pain/Terror style band at a show like this but variety is the spice of life! Seeing as ATR have their ties to punk and hardcore, it's a nice idea to have at least one punk or hardcore band supporting. Being made up of drum n bass lovers and ATR fans, Eternal Struggle maybe seemed like the most logical choice (also, their manager organised the event but shhh!).



Although Eternal Struggle get a really good crowd at their own shows, the head count isn't quite the same tonight because of this particular event's demographic. However, their mosh parts and beatdowns get a few people running around and a fair bit of hair banging. It's a shame they didn't do their usual cover of Sick Of It All's Take The Night Off but maybe it is about time they stuck with the strength of their original material. Hardcore dancing still isn't quite the done thing out in these parts but they would totally get that sort of action Stateside and in Europe.

5/5


Mechonat Hereg




When this show was initially announced, there was no doubt in my mind that Mechonat Hereg (Killing Machine) were going to support. I don't know much about them and only caught them live briefly before but they are essentially the Israeli Atari Teenage Riot. The blueprint is essentially the same; fast breakbeats, noises and harsh punk-like male/female vocals. Difference between the two acts is that ATR actually have structured songs. Mechonat Hereg are more of a rave band for low-key shows. They've got good energy and are the only people doing this sort of thing in the country (as far as i'm aware). Unfortunately, the music keeps randomly dropping out (some form of technical issue) which dampens the atmosphere a little and is generally a tad disappointing. The vocals and delivery are also nothing special, although vocalist Yam has an interestingly super high-pitched voice which reminds me a little of Manda Rin from Scottish electro-Brit pop trio Bis. Technically, that's a good thing as I loved Bis but I can imagine it's not for everyone.

2.5/5

Atari Teenage Riot



As more people fill up the Gagarin dance floor, everyone's anticipating the main event. I, personally, have always respected Atari Teenage Riot as I liked how they mixed electronic music with the intensity of punk. This especially came through in a live clip I saw of them from Reading Festival '99. Although I was actually at that festival as a 13 year old (my first ever big show), I didn't go the day they played but managed to catch it on TV. With the old line up including the late Carl Crack and former co-singer Hanin Elias, it was simply a high octane performance full of full throttle beats, screaming and buckets of sweat. I know that the line-up has since changed but I have been hoping for that same kind of experience.

As the lights dim, we faintly see Zan Lyons, a sometime member of ATR, step behind the table of laptops, controls and samplers. He's closely followed by man of the night, Alec Empire, the main founder of the group and poster boy for the fast paced, noisy and hyper digital hardcore sound. Alec is encouraging the crowd from the start, raising his clenched fists in the air as the venue fills with pulsating rhythms and noises and Zan operates visuals.

During the set, Alec moves to the foreground to shout and jump around with partner-in-crime, Nic Endo. Although it is odd to see her without her iconic painted Japanese symbol on the side of her face, Nic still has an amazing presence as she moves around the stage in an almost assertive fashion. Likewise, Alec has the complete attention of the crowd and they have his, as he locks eyes with everyone while spitting his lyrics of revolution and anarchy.

Many of the ATR fans here tonight have most likely come because of the band's earlier work. Some of the newer songs from the 2014's Reset album, such as J1M1 and the untypical Modern Liars with its strangely melodic and pop-like chorus, do not fare too well at the start of the set. However, it's actually album track Transducer's heavy thumping beat that initially gets the crowd uniting and thrusting themselves around like a wave. 
The more classic tracks like Revolution Action, Into The Death and No Remorse (I Wanna Die), the latter of which contains a Slayer sample, get the biggest reception from the crowd due to being the more energetic and punk/metal influenced.

Although there are those out there who may not be happy with the change of line-up, it does not seem to have affected ATR's live performance. Their set may contain newer songs that break away from the sound many fans know and love but the high energy and dedicated performance that I remember seeing on TV all those years ago is still there. Alec's personal love for Israel may have definitely encouraged his enthusiasm but I'm pretty sure him and Nic have that same passion everywhere they go. 




4/5
All photos by Adam Oscar


Tuesday, 20 December 2016

Live Review: Toy Dolls + Aviv Mark ve HaNetzach @ Reading 3, Tel Aviv [9th December 2016]

Once in a while, a legendary act will come to Tel Aviv. Normally it's a 60s/70s rock band or a singer/song writer but on the odd occasion like today, we get to witness one of the oldest British punk bands. The Toy Dolls might not be all that relevant in the scheme of punk rock nowadays but a lot of the bands that are would tell you that they were a big influence. Therefore, there are a lot of punk fans, both old school and new school, attending tonight's show at Reading 3, a pretty swanky looking venue in the north of Tel Aviv by the sea.

Aviv Mark ve HaNetzach



   Opening up tonight's event is local band Aviv Mark ve HaNetzach (which I think stands for "Aviv Mark and The Eternity"). Previously known as Aviv mark ve HaMavet ("Aviv Mark and The Death"?), it's a pretty typically mature-aged Israeli "alternative" group. With two drummers, they come off a bit like Melvins but just not as heavy or as interesting. There's the odd good riff and sometimes the two drum kits are put to good use by playing different patterns at the same times but it does also get a little messy. With my attention to Hebrew lyrics never really at its best in a live setting, I can't really say much about lyrical content but the vibe is mostly dark. It's more 80s new-wave meets 90s grunge and just similar to quite a few bands I've seen/heard out here before. It is still fun to watch, especially the energy of both drummers and the bassist, but out of all the acts in Israel who could support tonight's main act, this choice doesn't really make sense.

2.5/5


The Toy Dolls



   To some, The Toy Dolls are a joke punk band only famous for their version of Nelly The Elephant. Tonight, there is many a fan who knows that they are more than that and the band prove it.



   Arriving on stage in their grey and red suit-like attire with tiny red ties and iconic sunglasses, Olga (guitar and lead vocals), Tommy (bass) and Duncan (drums) are met with raucous applause and cheering. I personally clapped the loudest for Duncan (Redmonds), for I am a Snuff fan and admire him for being a great singing drummer.


   Being a band with a repertoire spanning 30+ years, it's hard to get every song and every hit into a set. Although the band doesn't supply the likes of  I Got Asthma, James Bond Lives Down Our Street or The Devil Went Down To Scunthorpe, they still do the fun Spiders In The Dressing Room, the rocking Idle Gossip and their superb and almost metallic rendition of Bach's Toccata in D Minor.

  Seeing and hearing The Toy Dolls in person is actually quite an interesting experience. Alongside silly songs like the catchy The Death Of Barry The Roofer With Vertigo and the infamous crowd-pleaser Nellie The Elephant, the latter of which unsurprisingly getting the greatest reception, they also play comparatively more sentimental songs such as Alec's Gone and She'll Be Back With Keith Someday. Using more melody and having deeper lyrical meaning than some of the others, these are personal highlights for me as I found myself singing along.

   As the band play through their set, that is practically all they do. There doesn't seem any need for too much banter, jokes or self indulgence, they basically play one song, say "thank you" and then crack on to the next one. Normally I would criticise a band for not being engaging enough but I can't accuse The Toy Dolls of that. Olga and Tommy are always looking at the crowd and encouraging them to sing along. The two also have good chemistry on stage, often jumping about and swapping places, doing Status Quo style synchronised guitar swaying and just seeming to be full of life. This rubs off on the crowd as even people standing at the back and the sides start to dance. Although the crowd aren't as rowdy as what I've seen before, the few that do find themselves on stage get quite heavily escorted off by security. Sometimes this makes sense if a crowd member is getting in the way of a performance or interfering with the musicians. That didn't seem the case this time and came off as unnecessarily aggressive.  


We hear more covers nearer the end of the set, including the instrumentals Wipe Out (The Surfaris) and the timeless classic When The Saints Go Marching In, but it's the final encore where we get the bouncy "la-la la" sing-along of She Goes To Finos to round off a fun night.


  Everyone has a different interpretation of what punk is. The Toy Dolls might not be as tough and serious as Sham 69 nor as fast and aggressive as Discharge but they do what they do well, with charisma and from the heart.

4/5

All photos courtesy of Miguel St Labao





Sunday, 23 October 2016

Live Review: LISP/Petey's Dead/Methods @ Keoss Studios, Tel Aviv [8th September 2016]

Awww yehh! New band time! Tonight, I've come to Keoss studios in Tel Aviv (which has suddenly been doing more and more shows) to check out the debut shows for two punk trios. One is practically a supergroup and the other is a sort of reboot of a previous band.


Methods



Starting off the night is alt. rock/metal/punk/whatever trio Methods. Methods have been quickly gaining recognition and rightly so! I've already been impressed by their previous performances and their tracks online. Tonight, they start off their set a little differently than I remember, with a more progressive and jazzy instrumental, slightly reminiscent of bands like And So I Watch You From Afar and 65daysofstatic. Although not normally my thing, it still has enough groove and interesting parts to make my head sway. From there on in, the band continue with their own blend of alt. rock sensibilities and technical musicianship. Throughout their set, a mixture of different bands come to mind, including alternative legends Therapy?, post-hardcore band Quicksand, British metallers Earthtone9 and even fast melodic punk band Strung Out. The already familiar Sub-dimension and 1.1 have a few heads bobbing and the rest of the set is equally enjoyable. Drummer, Vladi, might have a few fumbles tonight here and there, but he is still one of the best technical drummers I've seen.The band are difficult to pigeonhole, but that makes them more intriguing and exciting.


3.5/5



Petey's Dead



Coming from the remains of the fairly unknown SaveIT, Petey's Dead still play the same Flatliners inspired punk. As well as new material, the band play the odd SaveIT track, such as the punchy and thought provoking Dennihalation In The Middle East from said band's first EP. The band may tackle quite political and serious subjects but do it subtly, which makes for good listening. There is nothing quite mind blowing about their performance but the material is incredibly well written. With guitarist Matan now in the ever-popular Not On Tour, Petey's Dead are getting more recognition and chances to play than SaveIT, so hopefully the music will start to speak for itself at shows and things will pick up.


3/5



LISP


While Petey's Dead is practically the same band with a new name, LISP is yet another product of different members of different bands wanting to create something new together. In this case, not only do we have Not On Tour bassist, Nir, and Kids Insane drummer, Yoni, but former Kids Insane guitarist, Assaf, is also on board.

Despite all being talented musicians from very reputable bands, LISP isn't quite the blend of hardcore and skater punk one was expecting. Instead, the songs tend to go along a more pop-punk vibe. As pleasant as the songs are, nothing quite grabs you or shocks you at all. Yoni's drumming does stand out, although not purely because of his skills like in previous bands. His heavy handed and more hardcore style comes off sounding a little out of place with the songs themselves.

Despite only having played one show, LISP are already in the process of making an album. It could very well be that their songs are just growers, so they might sound better on record. Either way, I'm looking forward to checking it out.

2.5/5